A British Army Field Officer delivering organisational and team leadership - Field Officer Leadership

Field Officer Leadership

Field Officer leadership is an important step. Up until now you’ve been a team leader. You’ve been leading a group of under 150 or so, able to recognise the face of every person you are responsible for. Now (apart from sub-unit command) you’re an organisational leader. The influence you wield over those at the bottom of your organisation is through others. Field Officer leadership is exercised much more frequently through writing, policy, planning and creating organisational culture. As a result your influence is wider but can be less satisfying. It also requires some different skills.

This is the Field Officer’s leadership problem: To have the most effect you need to be capable at organisational leadership. To have a happy immediate team you need to use the team leadership skills that your displayed as a junior leader. To go back to John Adair, you need to think about the three circle (task, team and individual) at two levels at once. Organisational leadership will deliver the organisation’s task. But you still have to think about your immediate team’s task, team and individual needs.

If you are tasked to run some leadership development for your subordinates, you’ll find some leadership development videos you can use here and some articles and advice on leadership development here. You’ll also find it useful to subscribe to HBR – their business leadership articles are normally focused at the organisational level.

If you wanted the latest leadership advice, written by and for Army leaders like you, then subscribe to The Army Leader and you’ll get it straight into your inbox.

 

Subscribe To The Army Leader

Media Credit: Image © Crown Copyright under Open Government Licence v3.0

Reimagining Defence

The Reimagining Defence Interview By The Army Leader What are the most important ideas and trends that every military leader must understand? Grey Zone conflict? Information warfare? The evolution of urban conflict in megacities? Right now there are plenty of contenders for ‘most important trend in defence’. Last week I spoke to two military officers…

Details

Christmas Leadership Book List 2019

Christmas Leadership Book List 2019 By Tim Heck, Book Reviews Editor Each year, with Christmas around the corner and High Street full of holiday sales, The Army Leader reaches out to respected military leaders, scholars, and authors to ask them for a recommendation for our Christmas leadership book list. This year we sought a more…

Details

Staff Ninja - Challenger Tank on exercise

Staff Ninja or Staff Monkey?

Staff Ninja or Staff Monkey? By David Crosbie The British Army, like many other armies, talks openly about being a learning organisation. Review and reflection are actively encouraged, with a view to making the institution and its people better in the long run. We even have an Army Command Standing Order for it (ACSO 1118,…

Details

Failure - A practioners Guide. US and Chilean SF train together

Failure: A Practioner’s View

Failure: A Practioner’s View By Lt Col Fernando Garetto, Some authors say that failure is a key element of learning. Others suggest that leaders should share their failures in order to make their people feel more comfortable with their own mistakes, contributing to the generation of a creative culture. Ed Catmul dedicated a whole chapter…

Details

Mutual Respect and the Modern Army

Mutual Respect and the Modern Army By WO1 JJ Fraser Recently I observed US Army Command Sergeant Major Crosby asking a few UK soldiers what their achievements were.  Almost every reply was based on promotion.  As I walked away, I asked myself the same question and found that I could not answer it.  Over a…

Details